Move More Aberdeen, a partnership project funded by Macmillan Cancer Support and delivered by Sport Aberdeen, offers a range of free activities to people living with cancer including gentle exercise groups, walking groups, gardening, circuits and wearable fitness trackers.

The service, which has reached a milestone of 300 referrals, has demonstrated an increase in physical activity levels, fitness, strength and quality of life for participants.

It will present its work at the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) 38th World Congress which is being held in Rio de Janeiro this week.

Jo Bell, Sport Aberdeen Director for Sport and Active Lifestyles, said:

“As a registered charity, Sport Aberdeen is committed to creating opportunities, inspiring people and changing lives through sport and physical activity.

“Through working in partnerships Sport Aberdeen is able to deliver a range of free activities aimed at helping people living with cancer to remain active whilst building confidence.

“We are extremely proud to be part of this international conference which has the power to help influence the future of physical activity and its proven benefits when used as part of cancer treatment.”

Josefine Björkqvist, coordinator for Move More Aberdeen and a Master’s student at the University of Aberdeen, said:

“Whilst there is good evidence demonstrating the benefits of physical activity for people living with cancer, there is still a gap in research around implementation and integration of physical activity into routine cancer care.

“We are excited to be sharing our work with the scientific community.”

Joanna Adamson, Macmillan Partnership Manager for North Scotland, said:

“This is an amazing accolade for Josefine and her team to be invited to participate in an international conference. It’s a fantastic way to present the work of Macmillan Cancer Support and Sport Aberdeen to the international community.”

The Move More Aberdeen team recently shared their work integrating physical activity into cancer care at the NHS Scotland Event 2017 and a detailed service poster is available online. The team will also be giving a presentation at the European Public Health Conference in Stockholm in November 2017.

Move More Aberdeen is open to people living with cancer at any stage of treatment and works in close partnership with NHS Grampian, Paths for All, CLAN Cancer Support and other local cancer services.

George Florence, 60, was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2016 and struggled with fatigue as a result of his diagnosis and treatment. During his radiotherapy treatment George joined the gentle exercise class at the radiotherapy department at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

“Move More Aberdeen has helped me build up my strength and fitness,” he says. “It is also good to meet other people who have been through cancer.”

Ian Rae, 52, was diagnosed with bladder cancer two and a half years ago. However, a routine check-up found the cancer had spread to his muscles, lung and other parts of his body. He underwent aggressive chemotherapy before having an operation to remove his bladder, prostate and part of his bowel.

“The treatment really took it out of me,” he says. “It was rough at times. After the operation, it was a struggle to walk. Doing the classes helped me get my confidence and fitness back.”

For more information about the project, please call the Move More Aberdeen team on 01224 047925 or email [email protected]